Tag Archives: Retro Gaming

Retro Gaming: NBA Jam (Sega Mega Drive)


BOOM SHAKALAKA!!!! Those two words (if they can even be called words) were ingrained into my brain as a 9 year old. I’d walk past an NBA Jam arcade machine and hear the awesome music and kids screaming with laughter when they were ‘heating up’. Well folks luckily for us back in 1993 the guys at Midway gave us a great port of the arcade classic NBA Jam to the Sega Mega Drive and later the Super Nintendo.

For 2 on 2 Basketball it doesn’t get much better than this game, scoring three times in a row will put your player on fire, turning the basketball into a flaming implement of can’t miss 3 pointers! The series is well known for its gravity defying dunks and no rules basketball antics. The voice commentary in this game was somewhat revolutionary in its day also, no other basketball game at the time was able to capture the excitement of televised basketball in a video game before.

The soundtrack is excellent and the game includes all 27 NBA Teams (from back in 1993). Being a fully licensed game by the NBA was a major deal as you could play from a selection of great NBA players like Scottie Pippen, Dominique Wilkins, Clyde Drexler, the list goes on. Unfortunately Michael Jordan does not make an appearance in this game, but around the time not too many Basketball games were lucky enough to obtain the Jordan license anyway.

From a time when we had many many Basketball video games to choose from, most pretty good ones also NBA Jam stands above them all as a diamond in a sea of slightly less polished by otherwise fairly shiny diamonds!

Retro Gaming: Sonic The Hedgehog 2 (Sega Mega Drive)


I don’t know about you but when I think of the Sega Mega Drive, the first thing I think of is Sonic The Hedgehog. More specifically, Sonic The Hedgehog 2 which came out for the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis in 1992. A 16-bit classic by anyone’s opinion developed by Team Sonic and Sega Technical Institute and a direct sequel to the 1991 release of the original Sonic The Hedgehog (also on the Mega Drive – there were also releases of Sonic on the Sega Master System but we won’t go into those now. Although they were apart of the same franchise all sonic releases on the master system were their own distinct individual games with no links to the mega drive releases).

The story of Sonic the Hedgehog 2 builds upon the original Sonic the Hedgehog game. Dr. Robotnik is plotting to take over the world with his army of animals he’s placed into robots, and continues to seek the power of the chaos emeralds – this time, to construct his ultimate weapon, an armored space station known as the Death Egg. Sonic, who has now befriended and teamed up with a new character, Tails, must progress through the levels, collect the emeralds himself, and defeat Robotnik.

Just like in the first game there are a number of hidden secrets and special stages that can be entered into when you pass a checkpoint with the required number of rings and by jumping into the circle of starts that shows above the checkpoint.

One very cool thing about Sonic the Hedgehog 2 is that 2 years later Sonic and Knuckles was released. Although released 2 years later these two games (and also Sonic 3) share a common link that was only made possible by the special ‘lock-on’ slot of the Sonic and Knuckles cartridge allowing you to insert another game into the top of the Sonic and Knuckles cartridge unlocking new functionality. If you insert Sonic 2 into the Sonic and Knuckles game cartridge you would unlock the ability to play as Knuckles in Sonic 2, even though Knuckles was not introduced into the Sonic family until 1994. The same can be done with Sonic 3, but again even more functionality can be gained by using the Sonic 3 cartridge since both those games were developed as one large game (more on that later).

All in all Sonic 2 for the Sega Mega Drive is a great game. If you are into retro gaming or a fan of Sega in general you really should hunt around for a copy of Sonic 2. In my opinion it’s probably the best Sonic game ever made (before Sonic started looking all weird and wide-eyed) and the first game in the franchise to include ‘Tails’ for co-op or single player companionship was great.

Retro Gaming: Super International Cricket (SNES)


The best thing about classic gaming is the memories that come flooding back from your childhood when you play these games. Not many games evoke such strong memories for me as Super International Cricket for the Super Nintendo does. Super International Cricket was released for the Super Nintendo in 1994 and was developed by famed Australian developer ‘Melbourne House’ (as Beam Software back then).

This game only saw release in Australia, Europe and Pakistan and was the sequel to the great ‘international cricket’ on the NES from 1992.

The games much improved visuals over its NES release are pleasing that no cricket video game of its time were able to match. The game also featured 3 difficulty levels (easy, medium and hard) and had many elements included that makes cricket (among fans) enjoyable to watch in real-life such as great catch animations, crowds getting involved and occasionally the possibility of hitting a ball into a seagull!

The game was not without its negatives though, a single one-track music loop would continuously play during the game and it only had 1 stadium to play in (some generic unnamed stadium). The game also suffered a little from a lack of official international cricket licensing, so all the player names are made up.

Nevertheless, even with these negatives this game is really amazing. I remember playing this game quite a lot back in my primary school days with friends over summer and as I previously mention no cricket game really game close to this one.

If you enjoy cricket and classic gaming in general you should pick up a copy of this game. Although they were only released in a few regions around the world, the game can be found with relative ease these days on eBay (especially eBay Australia) for only a couple of dollars. I was able to find my copy for about $5. As with all older games beware of games that no longer work. My copy did not work initially but after a little cleaning it now works brilliantly.

 

Retro Gaming: A Look At Metal Gear Solid (PSX)


What comes to mind when you think of 90’s video gaming? More specifically the 32-bit era of video gaming in the mid to late 90’s? One gem stands out as a diamond in a field of diamonds (there were heaps of truly epic games on the 32-bit platform) but one stands above the rest. That game is ‘Metal Gear Solid’ released by Konami for the Sony Playstation in 1998. It is a single player stealth action game with a top down camera style.

You play the role of an elite soldier ‘Solid Snake’ who must infiltrate a nuclear weapons disposal base called ‘Shadow Moses’ in the cold Alaska wilderness. The game takes place somewhere between Febuary 21st and 27th 2005, 6 years after the events of Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake (released on the NES – not to be confused with Metal Gear Solid 2 on the PS2).

A genetically enhanced, renegade special forces unit, FOXHOUND, leads an armed uprising on a remote island in Alaska’s Fox Archipelago. This island, codenamed “Shadow Moses”, is the site of a nuclear weapons disposal facility. The forces that seized this island, led by a mercenary known as Liquid Snake, have acquired the nuclear-capable mecha, Metal Gear REX, and are threatening the U.S government with a nuclear reprisal if they do not receive the remains of the “legendary mercenary” Big Boss within 24 hours. – Source: wikipedia.com

Back when the game released almost 15 years ago it scored many 90%-100% review ratings and it is easy to see why. To give you an idea of the story and game itself, check out one of the best intro’s to a video game ever:

The game still holds up very well by today’s standards, sure the graphics do seem a little dated but the storytelling and gameplay is 2nd to none. The sounds of the codec ringing in your ear, or the clicking through your inventory with the left and right shoulder buttons is hard to forget. If you’ve played through the newer Metal Gear Solid releases you’ll be used to being able to aim your weapons using a first-person view style that is sorely missing from the original on the PSX but apart from that its hard to fault this game. The boss battles you have are challenging, the sound effects and music are simply amazing (some of the best music composed for a game – thanks Harry Greggson Williams!) and the connection you build with the characters in the game leave you wanting more well after the final metal gear Rex battle at the end of the game.

One of the highlights of this game for me was the battle and connections you build with the ‘Sniper Wolf’ character. She is an elite Russian sniper who has a deep connection with her surroundings and her wolves. When you hear the howling of wolves in the distance, you know you’re close.

If you are a fan of action games or gaming in general you really need to pick up a copy and play this game.

Retro Gaming: Sega Mega Drive Model 2 – The Collection Is Growing!


Just as in my previous post with the Sega Mega Drive model 1 being a near mint condition retro console, I was able to pick up a near-new Sega Mega Drive model 2 today!

The Sega Mega Drive model 2 (MK-1631-50) was released by Sega in PAL regions (including Australia) in 1993 shortly after Nintendo released the Super Nintendo in the region. The Sega Mega Drive 2 differs from its bigger brother the model 1 in a number of ways. Most notably the physical size of the console is much smaller and compact with a new ‘square’ shape and the absence of a stereo headphone jack meant you can only play your mega drive games in mono sound loosing much of the sound quality from games that much such great use of the model 1 sound abilities.

As such the model 2 is usually had for a much cheaper price than the slightly rarer model 1 with many more of them produced and less demand for the unit. Any collectors out there can find a mega drive 2 in decent condition for around $30-50 AUD. Just as the model 1, the entire Sega Mega Drive library of games can be played on the model 2.

Being able to add this console to my collection is a great thing, the mega drive was a great console (still is) and shows Sega’s progression in the gaming industry nicely. Just need to find myself a Sega Saturn which will be the next step!

Retro Gaming: Sega Mega Drive Model 1


It has been far too long since my last retro gaming update, but unfortunately for the first half of the year I just have not had the time to expand my video game console collection. Luckily now though I have the means to continue my collection and what better way to do so than with a Sega Mega Drive Mk 1.

I was lucky enough to find a near-mint condition Sega Mega Drive model 1 for about $50 which is awesome (I also picked up a Mega Drive model 2 for about the same price which I’ll cover in my next post). Comes with the brilliant Sega Mega Drive 3-button controller, AV cables, power cables, everything you need to get up and running quickly. No need to scrounge around on EBay trying to track those down. For collectors trying to find old consoles in excellent condition you know how difficult that actually is so I’m very very impressed with myself for being able to find such a well looked after Mega Drive.

The Sega Mega Drive model 1 was released by Sega in 1988 in Japan, followed by a north american released in 1989 as the Sega Genesis then in PAL regions (including Australia, UK, etc) in 1990. It was one of the first 16-bit consoles to hit the market and allowed Sega to gain some market share of the home video game scene from the popular Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) which came out years before in 1985. The extra power of the Mega Drive’s 16-bit architecture showed some stunning graphics of its time far surpassing its rival Nintendo’s offering on the 8-bit NES. However shortly after worldwide release, Nintendo would release the successor to the NES the Super Nintendo (SNES) in 1991. For most of the early 90’s Sega and Nintendo both shared roughly equal market share (around 40%) during the 16-bit era. Some say the 16 bit gaming days showcased some of gamings greatest games of all time.

If you are a vintage/retro collector and are looking to buy a Sega Mega Drive I’d definitely recommend the model 1 over the smaller more slimmer model 2. The model 2 looks good but actually the model 1 has a few extra features over the model 2. For starters, the model 1 has a nice stereo headphone jack in the front. When coupled with stereo RCA to mini stereo jack cable you can play your Mega Drive games in STEREO sound instead of the mono sound you get from the standard RF-switch or AV connections on the back of the unit. The second benefit is that the audio processor in the model 1 is better than in the model 2. The audio is more crisp and cleaner than in the model 2 but if you didn’t know that you probably would not have picked up on it by listening to the difference.

All in all I’m very happy with the addition to my console collection of the Mega Drive model 1. I was a Super Nintendo kid back in the 90’s not playing many Sega games but looking at this console now and playing some great games like Sonic, Columns, Alex Kidd, Altered Beast, etc it’s easy to see why Sega was able to give Nintendo such a run for their money.

Retro Gaming: Donkey Kong Country Awesomeness!


Donkey Kong Country SNES Cover

Donkey Kong Country on the Super Nintendo and probably one of my most favourite games on the Super Nintendo ever made.

A side-scrolling platformer video game developed by Rare featuring the character Donkey Kong, it was released for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1994. Following an intense marketing campaign, the original SNES version sold over 8 million copies worldwide, making it the second best-selling SNES game behind Super Mario World (which sold over 20 million copies…pretty large gap!).

I Managed to get my hands on a copy of the game on eBay for $15 so a pretty good deal. I’m really having fun finding the old games I used to love playing as a kid, brings back great memories!