Online Social Networking: Social Injustice or Social Greatness?


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These days there are so many ways to stay in touch with your friends online. You’ve got MySpace, blogs, Friendster, Instant Messaging, twitter and Facebook just to name a few. With all this choice online have we started to forget how to socialize in reality? Have we lost most of our communication skills and as a consequence the best we can come up with these days is a short 5 word sentence to update your status, or a ROFLMAO, LOL, WOOT!

Some will argue that social networking sites such as Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, etc have made us lazier with conversation and that many school age children are using these sites for hours upon hours a day. If you’re using services such as this are younger children skewing their English language development just by using websites like these?

myspace Fair enough if you’re a bit older and actually grew up with an English teacher before all this started (web 2.0) as your English skills are probably alright, or at least not half bad, but there are many children these days using sites like Facebook at 8 years old, some even younger. It’s not just learning difficulties that young people may face being constantly surrounded by the online hype but do these types of services make younger people more aggressive or violent?

You can’t really pin this one on social network websites, it would be more fair to lay blame on the internet itself perhaps? When I was younger growing up I didn’t have an internet connection as available to me as most kids have these days. If I did would I have turned out different? Would my education have been affected?

The truth of the matter is, to an extent I think the “online revolution” kids have grown up with these days may be the new “Nintendo Thumb” of this generation but cannot possibly be the sole reason behind a possible rise in violence and attitudes of kids today.

I know for a fact that social network websites give kids greater access to their friends anyone thought imaginable back in the day. Kids can send audio, photos and videos of themselves and we’ve seen problems in some schools with pornographic images taken of themselves and circulated amongst their circle of friends raising all kinds of ethical questions.

Getting away from kids for a moment. You could argue that social networking sites affect us adults in more ways than we first thought. We loose productivity at work if our MySpace or Facebook addictions take hold for too long, some employees have even lost their jobs over spending too much time at work on these websites.

In our society today, are social networking websites as much of a problem to our society than gambling or tobacco addiction? It’s much of a muchness I guess, the question is can you really classify Facebook as an addiction. For most people…it is not.

I’ve gone of on a few different tangents, and granted I didn’t really spend a lot of time exploring any of them. I’m merely just exploring my thoughts. I’m not expecting anything to make sense, but if some of it does then that’s great.

What do you think of social networking sites of today and how do you think they affect our society?

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One thought on “Online Social Networking: Social Injustice or Social Greatness?

  1. great insights. i’ve found Fbook to be a great tool in connecting with all of my youth kids in the area. of course i spend too much time online when i should be doing other things, but overall, it has enabled me to quickly and more accurately communicate with hundreds of people that i would otherwise probably bypass. it has sparked debates, reconciled friendships, created enemies, and spawned creative ideas. obviously one can’t credit the internet (much less one particular network) with these things, they are facts of life and would happen elsewhere by other means if not here and now. i wonder though, if it helps the underdog in society, who doesn’t have a big voice, to share their life and opinions and have an input by infinately easier means…
    laj

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